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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Vice President Pence and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat next to each other and chatted briefly Thursday at the East Asia Summit in Singapore, in a conversation that also included national security adviser John Bolton.

Pence and Putin "discussed the upcoming G20 Summit and touched on the issues that will be discussed when President Trump and President Putin are both in Argentina for the summit," according to the vice president's press secretary, Alyssa Farah.

The G20 Summit will be held in Buenos Aires at the end of November.

Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor is calling for the death penalty for five people accused of involvement in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, the journalist and critic of the royal regime who died last month at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The office of Prosecutor Saud al-Mojeb issued a statement saying that his office has indicted 11 suspects, adding that the prosecutor "has requested the death penalty for (5) individuals who are charged with ordering and committing the crime."

Acting on a tip about explosives at a house in Lake Helen, Fla., police discovered jars of highly volatile triacetone triperoxide, or TATP — the same material used in terrorist bombing attacks mounted by ISIS and al-Qaida. Jared E. Coburn, 37, was arrested after officers were told he had a bomb under his bed.

Minutes before the deadly Camp and Woolsey fires started in Northern and Southern California on Thursday, utilities reported problems with electricity lines in the same areas where the blazes sprang up, according to filings with the state regulatory commission.

Together, the two fires have been blamed for 44 deaths and have consumed more than 200,000 acres of land, as of around midday Tuesday. The Camp fire is now the deadliest wildfire in state history, responsible for at least 42 deaths.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET on Wednesday

Fire investigators in Northern California say they found the human remains of 6 more individuals, bringing the death toll to at least 48 people who have died in the wildfire that burned through the town of Paradise with shocking speed, making the Camp Fire the deadliest wildfire in state history.

Fire crews are working to fight that blaze, along with another large wildfire in Southern California, where at least two deaths have been reported.

Updated at 12:57 p.m. ET

Canada's intelligence agency has heard audio recordings that Turkey says are a crucial part of its evidence that Saudi operatives murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Monday — the first time a leader of a Western nation has acknowledged receiving the recordings.

Updated at 10:48 p.m. ET

Wildfires continued to tear through Northern and Southern California on Monday, where firefighters were at the mercy of dry air and whipping winds fanning the deadly blazes. At least 44 people have died statewide; many people remain unaccounted for.

In a year of record-breaking fires, Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott told NPR's All Things Considered the Camp fire in the north and Woolsey fire in the south may be "the most destructive and the deadliest" on record for the state.

Colorado voters have approved an amendment to their state's constitution that completely abolishes slavery — by stripping out language that still exists in the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which bans slavery and servitude "except as a punishment."

Voters in Michigan approved a ballot measure to legalize recreational use of marijuana on Tuesday, and two other states — Missouri and Utah — endorsed medical marijuana laws. Voters in North Dakota didn't partake, rejecting a measure to legalize recreational marijuana use.

Now 33 states have legalized marijuana to some degree, and recreational pot use is now legal in 10 states, along with Washington, D.C. But possessing, selling or using marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

A Russian fighter jet made two close passes as it intercepted a U.S. EP-3 Aries reconnaissance plane, the U.S. Navy says, releasing video of what it called an unsafe and irresponsible encounter. Russia's military says the Su-27 "escorted" the spy plane away over neutral waters in the Black Sea. But the U.S. says the fighter crossed directly in front of the spy plane.

Investigators have found 202 mass graves in Iraq, a grisly reminder of the Islamic State's terror-based control of large parts of that country, according to a new report by the United Nations. The agency says at least 6,000 people were buried at the sites — and possibly more than 12,000.

The Supreme Court has rejected telecom companies' attempts to quash a lower court's decision that upheld net neutrality rules set during the Obama administration. AT&T and other telecoms had asked the high court to void the ruling; the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality last year.

The FCC itself also was in favor of voiding the decision that upheld its 2015-era rules, according to Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat on the commission.

Slain journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed as he tried to arrange paperwork for his wedding — and his fiancée, Hatice Cengiz, says it's been impossible for her to cope with his death, because of the events that began with Khashoggi dying at Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul.

Mario Segale, who inspired the plucky plumber Mario — one of the most recognizable characters in the world, let alone in video games — has died at age 84. Segale was Nintendo's landlord outside Seattle when the company created Donkey Kong, the classic game that launched the overalls-wearing Mario.

Millions of people are mourning Jin Yong — the pen name for novelist Louis Cha — after the giant of Chinese pop culture and literature died on Tuesday. Cha wrote epic stories that created an underpinning for the pageantry and fantasy of martial arts films.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

House Speaker Paul Ryan pushed back on Tuesday on President Trump's claim that he can strip birthright citizenship from the U.S. via executive order, saying such a move would be "unconstitutional."

Updated at 1:51 p.m. ET

A suspicious package addressed to CNN's office in Atlanta was intercepted on Monday, the network said, adding that all of its mail is being screened off-site.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she will step down from leading the Christian Democratic Union and won't seek re-election, rattling the political scene in Germany and setting the stage for her to eventually be replaced in her country's highest office.

"The time has come to open a new chapter," Merkel said.

Merkel, 64, announced the move on Monday, speaking in Berlin after meetings about her party's struggles in Germany's recent election.

"It's a wall," said Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, standing in the shadow of a newly built stretch of a 30-foot border wall in Calexico, Calif., which she said would help U.S. agents secure the border.

The wall was built to replace an older barrier in the same area. But Nielsen celebrated its opening as a symbol of the Trump administration's hopes of building a longer wall — and she also provided details about the U.S. plan to send hundreds of troops to the border, to help stop the flow of people entering the U.S. illegally.

Police in Salisbury, England, have arrested a man who, they say, tried to steal the Magna Carta — the 1215 document that established basic tenets of the rule of law. "The Magna Carta has not been damaged and nobody was injured in the incident," Wiltshire Police said.

The police say the man set off alarms at the Salisbury Cathedral when he tried to shatter the glass shield that protects the Magna Carta. The document was not damaged, police say.

Updated at 7:45 a.m. ET Friday

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is expected to sign an order sending at least 800 U.S. troops to the U.S.-Mexico border as a caravan of thousands of migrants heads north from Central America.

Super Typhoon Yutu is on its way to Southeast Asia, after devastating part of the commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. "Many homes have been destroyed," says the mayor of Tinian, an island in the U.S. Pacific territory.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

Federal authorities expanded their nationwide search on Thursday for the person who sent a wave of suspected explosive devices to political nemeses of President Trump.

Ten devices addressed to eight targets have been intercepted or discovered, but no one has been hurt. It isn't clear whether or not the attack is over; the FBI said it can't rule out that more suspicious packages might still be moving through the mail.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman says the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi was "a heinous crime" committed by people who must be brought to justice. The prince, who has fallen under suspicion for possibly ordering the killing, discussed the case Wednesday at the "Davos in the Desert" investment forum.

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

At least seven suspicious packages containing what the FBI called potentially destructive devices have been sent since Monday to several leading Democratic Party figures and to CNN in New York, triggering a massive investigation.

Updated at 8:14 p.m. ET

Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor says she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease," in an open letter that was released Tuesday.

O'Connor, 88, is the first woman to serve on the high court and has remained active since retiring in 2006. She left the court to care for her husband, John, after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Now, O'Connor says, her condition is forcing her to withdraw from public life.

Updated at 7:04 p.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Tuesday afternoon that 21 Saudi suspects in the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi will have their visas revoked or be ineligible for a visa to enter the United States.

A new bridge in southern China will shave more than two hours off the trip from Hong Kong to Zhuhai on the mainland. The result of nearly nine years of construction, the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge project even includes a tunnel in its 34 miles across the Pearl River Delta.

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