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All Things Considered

Weekdays, 3pm - 5:30pm
  • Hosted by Mary Louise Kelly, Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers
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"Live & Local" - 3:45pm

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.  A perfect mix of local and national news and persons of note to get you through the afternoon.

If you miss the "Live & Local" interview, you can find them all archived here: https://www.kios.org/topic/live-local

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With pressure mounting on President Trump, there's a new focus on a question that has come up since Day 1 of the Trump administration. Can he pardon himself? NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports.

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Wrapping Up News Of The Day

Jan 6, 2021

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All right, taking stock of the day now; a day that started with lawmakers on Capitol Hill and ended in the same space. In between, pro-Trump insurrectionists, many of them armed, broke down fences.

(SOUNDBITE OF RIOT AMBIENCE)

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And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Georgia, where canvassers have been knocking on how many doors?

NSE UFOT: We are a couple of minutes away from knocking on our 2 millionth door.

KELLY: In Georgia.

UFOT: In Georgia.

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In Los Angeles, ambulances are waiting for hours — up to eight, in some cases — to admit new patients at overwhelmed hospitals. The number of coronavirus patients in intensive care units has more than quadrupled since the beginning of November.

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A moment now to remember a pioneering Internet technology. Adobe Flash Player is dead. Long live Adobe Flash Player.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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And finally today, you know you've heard those ads. You might even have succumbed to one of them. I'm talking about the big push for new gym memberships. It's usually right now. And that's because getting fit is one of the most common New Year's resolutions. But this year, many gyms are closed because of the pandemic. So what are the alternatives for people who are resolved to get fit in 2021? We reached out to Jennipher Walters for some ideas. She is a certified personal trainer and health coach, and she also co-hosts the "Fit Bottomed Girls" podcast.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, you know you've heard those ads. You might even have succumbed to one of them. I'm talking about the big push for new gym memberships. It's usually right now. And that's because getting fit is one of the most common New Year's resolutions. But this year, many gyms are closed because of the pandemic. So what are the alternatives for people who are resolved to get fit in 2021? We reached out to Jennipher Walters for some ideas. She is a certified personal trainer and health coach, and she also co-hosts the "Fit Bottomed Girls" podcast.

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In a year where we all started wearing masks, we lost someone best known for performing in one.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BEEF RAPP")

MF DOOM: (Rapping) He wears a mask just to cover the raw flesh, a rather ugly brother with flows that's gorgeous.

As surging coronavirus cases push intensive care units across Los Angeles to the breaking point, Mayor Eric Garcetti says what's needed more than hospital space and safety equipment right now is trained health workers and more vaccine doses.

"The toughest thing right now isn't just space — though it's pinched — it's really personnel and getting enough people to be there for the shifts to save lives," Garcetti tells All Things Considered. "That's increasingly where we are feeling the crunch."

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