KIOS-FM

Jazz in the Afternoon Tuesday and Thursday

Tuesday and Thursday, 1pm - 3pm

For over thirty years, Jazz in the Afternoon has brought you mainstream jazz here on KIOS FM. Every Tuesday-Friday from 1:00-3:00PM Chris Cooke(pictured) and Mike Jacobs present the wide spectrum of jazz recordings dating back to the "golden age" of jazz in the 1920's through it's evolution in swing, bop, Latin and other styles right up to today's new releases. We also have a strong commitment to keeping you up to date on the local scene bringing you artists from the Omaha, Council Bluffs and Lincoln areas and partnering with local non-profit organizations to publicize major jazz concerts in our area with music and interviews. Straight-ahead and in the pocket. Jazz in the Afternoon is your ticket to great jazz music during the weekdays here at KIOS. Have a question or comment? Write us at jazz@kios.org

Jazz Calendar (Updated 1/21/2020)

Jan 21, 2020

 

An anthology devoted to early Nat King Cole recordings was recently released, and it offers a new window into his artistic development. The collection is called Hittin' the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943), and this massive 7-CD, 10-LP package is clearly aimed at obsessives. It's a deep dive that traces Nat King Cole's evolution — from smooth, unflappable piano player into a singing star with an endearingly smooth style all his own.

Cannonball Adderley was a mere 46 when he died, of a brain hemorrhage, in 1975. An alto saxophonist of robust intellect and irrefutable soul, he left a monumental legacy during his two decades in the spotlight — as a member of the Miles Davis Sextet, an exemplar of 1960s soul jazz and the leading avatar of a brand of post-bop modernism with popular appeal.

From a casual distance, the music of João Gilberto sounds like it might belong to that ancient realm known as "easy listening."

Chris Cooke/KIOS

Mike Jacobs/KIOS

In 2005, even as the flood waters that rose in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina subsumed his home along with countless others, Allen Toussaint was reluctant to leave his city. But the elegant architect of New Orleans rhythm and blues was left with no other option. Just a day after his evacuation, in an interview with Rolling Stone, he described the experience less in terms of what had been lost than what could yet be gained.

As much as jazz could possibly have an inventor, that person would be Charles "Buddy" Bolden. But although he is celebrated as a seminal figure in jazz at the turn of the 20th century, very little is actually known about the African-American cornetist and composer's life. There are no existing recordings of Bolden, who spent more than 20 years in an asylum before his death in 1931.

Roy Hargrove, an incisive trumpeter who embodied the brightest promise of his jazz generation, both as a young steward of the bebop tradition and a savvy bridge to hip-hop and R&B, died on Friday night in New York City. He was 49.

The cause was cardiac arrest, according to his longtime manager, Larry Clothier. Hargrove had been admitted to the hospital for reasons related to kidney function.

Remembering Jazz Pianist Randy Weston

Sep 4, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF RANDY WESTON COMPOSITION)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, this morning we are remembering the jazz pianist Randy Weston.

(SOUNDBITE OF RANDY WESTON COMPOSITION)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This story originally aired on Feb. 28, 2017 on All Things Considered.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, jazz pianist and composer Randy Weston died this weekend. He was 92 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF RANDY WESTON'S "HI-FLY")

"It used to be: 'Nashville — that's where you come to play country music.'"

Joe Spivey is voicing a prevailing view of his adopted hometown, one that has endured for the better part of a century. But Spivey — a fiddler in The Time Jumpers, the swingingest band in Music City — knows better. He definitely plays his share of country music, but he's also one of a burgeoning number of musicians who make up the robust and soulful Nashville jazz scene.

Aretha Franklin was about a month shy of her 20th birthday when she appeared for a week at The Village Gate in late February of 1962. She shared a bill there with pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who like her was an indescribable talent — a genius, in the fullest sense of the word — recently signed to the roster of Columbia Records.

New York's Village Vanguard may come closer than any other club to embodying the spirit of jazz. For nearly 30 years, the guardian of that spirit has been the Vanguard's formidable impresaria, Lorraine Gordon. Gordon, a jazz champion since her teen years and one of the music's female pioneers, died Saturday at the age of 95.

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