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Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 4am - 10am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep and Rachel Martin
  • Local Anchor Matthias Jeske

Local News Update - 6:04am, 7:04am, 8:04am, 9:04am

"Live & Local" - 7:45am

Marketplace Morning Report - 5:51am, 7:51am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and Rachel Martin. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news firsthand.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

You can go the the national website for Morning Edition by clicking this link: https://www.npr.org/programs/morning-edition/

If you miss the "Live & Local" interview, you can find them all archived here: https://www.kios.org/topic/live-local

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Two years after two women came forward and accused him of sexual assault, Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax is now running to become the state's next governor. Not only does he maintain his innocence, he says he was treated like George Floyd and Emmett Till.

"It becomes a complete injustice — and one that mirrors a history of racial injustice — when as an African American, you have no opportunity to establish that these allegations are not true," Fairfax said in an interview with NPR in March.

For three straight nights, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand took to the Senate floor to ask for quick approval of her bill to reform the military's criminal justice system.

After eight years of trying, the Democrat and longtime member of the Senate Armed Services Committee finally has the votes needed to approve the transformative legislation in the upper chamber. The bill has more than 60 cosponsors.

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Artist Paul Rucker is fearless when it comes to taking on terrible moments in American history.

"The work that I do evolves mostly around the things I was never taught about," Rucker explains. Over Zoom, he's discussing his work in progress, Three Black Wall Streets, which evokes and honors the achievements of Black entrepreneurs and visionaries who created thriving spaces of possibility and sanctuary after the end of the Civil War.

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Very often, the simplest thing to compromise is a debate over numbers. You tell your kid to go to bed in 10 minutes, she asks for 20, so you settle on 15.

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This episode of StoryCorps originally aired in 2018.

When Army Spc. Robert Joseph Allen returned from a yearlong deployment in Iraq, his mother, Cathy Sprigg, was glad he was home safe.

Until she realized that he wasn't. Sprigg said that her son — who once saw life with "his cup half full" — was now tormented by nightmares and the painful experiences he witnessed overseas.

In 2012, Allen died by suicide.

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What You Need To Know About Biden's Budget

May 28, 2021

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In Congress, populists are in power on the committees that oversee the big banks. And as NPR's David Gura reports, that means Washington is a tougher environment for the CEOs running those banks.

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Updated May 27, 2021 at 12:12 PM ET

A group of Senate Republicans on Thursday unveiled a $928 billion infrastructure proposal to counter President Biden's plan for a nearly $2 trillion bill.

Updated May 27, 2021 at 11:21 AM ET

The idea that the coronavirus could have leaked from a lab in Wuhan, China — instead of jumping from animals to humans — was dismissed as a conspiracy theory by many scientists a year ago. That has changed now.

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Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Memorial Day weekend starts tomorrow - yay. That means pools are going to be open for the season. One rowdy group in Tennessee got their swim on early.

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