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Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 4am - 9am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin, and David Greene
  • Local Anchor Matthias Jeske

Local News Update - 6:04am, 7:04am, 8:04am

"Live & Local" - 8:45am

Marketplace Morning Report - 5:51am, 7:51am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep, David Greene and Rachel Martin. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news firsthand.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

You can go the the national website for Morning Edition by clicking this link: https://www.npr.org/programs/morning-edition/

If you miss the "Live & Local" interview, you can find them all archived here: https://www.kios.org/topic/live-local

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Cast members have recorded sketches remotely for Saturday Night Live at Home.
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During the pandemic lockdown, what's left of Hollywood production has

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The highest unemployment rate in America since the Great Depression is even higher among Latinos. The overall jobless rate is 14.7% as we learned the other day. And for Latinos, it is 19%. Claudia Alejandra (ph) was furloughed by Macy's in Orlando.

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As Minnesota Gov. Walz weighs his decision on when to let nonessential businesses reopen, he's facing a lot of pressure from a frustrated workforce, especially from small business owners who are trying to stay afloat during the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

"The frustrations that they have are real. These are businesses that, they may have been in families for generations or they built up," the Democratic governor says in an interview with Morning Edition.

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Alice Stockton-Rossini and her 90-year-old mother, Jackie Stockton, survived COVID-19.

But the virus took the lives of some of their friends and a relative.

The outbreak in their community in Ship Bottom, N.J., can be traced back to Stockton's 90th birthday party, held at her church on March 8 before much of the U.S. began practicing social distancing.

In a recent remote StoryCorps conversation, Stockton told her 62-year-old daughter that she didn't realize she had contracted the virus until she landed in the hospital.

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This country's top uniformed military officer is wrestling with a special problem of the pandemic. The military has to protect its people, but unlike schools and businesses, it can never shut down.

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The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionately large effect on black Americans. So what can local officials do to make sure that the communities hit hardest are getting the right information about this virus? Here's NPR's Juana Summers.

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Is it time for states to reopen their economies? President Trump really wants it to happen. But the question is whether or not it's safe.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. You may have heard that the U.S. Supreme Court is livestreaming oral arguments this week. Well, yesterday, the following sound was also livestreamed.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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For two nights, people in the small coastal city of Brunswick, Ga., have been protesting an incident that happened in late February.

(SOUNDBITE OF ACHIVED RECORDING)

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In Baghdad today, Parliament approved a new Iraqi prime minister and Cabinet after almost six months of a caretaker government. NPR's Jane Arraf has the story from Amman, Jordan.

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Since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., officials have been warning about the prospect of a second wave. Some even say additional COVID-19 spikes in the country could be worse than the first wave.

Dr. Ali Khan, former director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says he is confident that a second wave will happen. That's because, he says in an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, the vast majority of people in the U.S. are likely still at risk of contracting the virus.

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Let's visit the kitchen of an elementary school counselor in Ohio. Her name is Marie Weller, and she has turned to YouTube to help kids stranded away from school during this pandemic. NPR's Cory Turner has been visiting with her.

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