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Lincoln Journal Star

Nebraska lawmakers have ended a historic session marked by major tax cuts, a grant program to expand high-speed internet service and regulations to clear the way for the state’s new casino industry. But they left major work unfinished, most notably the once-a-decade ritual of redrawing the state’s congressional and legislative districts. That means they'll have to return to the Capitol later this year. The session was also shaped by the coronavirus pandemic and bitter disputes over how to use excess money in the state budget.

NET Nebraska

Nebraska’s population grew at the same rate as the rest of the nation for the first time in at least 120 years, breaking the cycle in which the state consistently trailed the United States average. New U.S. Census numbers show Nebraska’s population increased 7.4% between 2010 and 2020, matching the national growth rate in the same period. The state had grown at slower pace every decade since at least 1900. David Drozd of the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s Center for Public Affairs Research says he had expected Nebraska’s growth to slightly lag the national growth rate.

The Lincoln Journal Star reports that researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Thursday released the 2017 Economic Impact of the Nebraska Agricultural Production Complex report. The report uses 2017 data because that was the year of the most recent Census of Agriculture. The report found that agriculture accounts for nearly 34% of business sales, 22% of the gross state product and nearly a quarter of the state’s jobs. Those figures were reported even though 2017 was the lowest-income year for Nebraska farmers and ranchers of the decade.

Lincoln First In Nation For Census Participation

Oct 1, 2020
WOWT

The city of Lincoln is tops in the nation when it comes to census reporting.  Lincoln ranks first among cities over 250-thousand people in census participation.  The city spent 40-thousand-dollars to encourage people to fill out their 2020 U.S. Census forms.  Lancaster County officials say the community will receive an additional 13-thousand-dollars in federal funding over the next decade for every person who takes part in the census.

The 2020 U.S. Census is entering the home stretch and the Bellevue University Library is hosting an event and offering free assistance to those who need help completing the 2020 U.S. Census.  

The community event will be held Thursday, September 10, 3:30-5:30 p.m., outside the front entrance of the Freeman Lozier Library located at 1028 Bruin Boulevard, Bellevue, Nebraska, 68005.  Staff from the U.S. Census and Bellevue University will be on hand to answer questions or assist individuals.  Accessible parking is available and a ramp is available for those who need it.  Additional parking is available south of the Bellevue University Durham Administration Building.  Face masks must be worn (and will be available, if necessary) and physical distancing will be observed.

Allie O’Connor, Document Delivery Specialist at BU, is heading up the census event that’s happening on campus.  She takes a moment out of her busy day to chat with Mike Hogan on KIOS-FM.

More information can be found at https://blogs.bellevue.edu/library/index.php/2020/09/cooperative-event-between-2020-census-and-bellevue-university-library/

The Census is a vital tool for fair economic and political decisions.  The data collected have a direct monetary impact on every state including Nebraska.  In the past, communities of color have been under represented for a variety of reasons.  Tragically, that under representation has the hardest economic impact on the very communities that were not accurately counted.

Dr. Lissette Aliaga-Linares, Assistant Professor of Sociology & OLLAS Faculty at the University of Nebraska Omaha joins Mike Hogan "Live & Local" in the KIOS-FM studios to discuss the issue and what can be done to fix it.

This is your chance to play a part in history!  Temporary census positions offer the perfect opportunity to earn extra income, while at the same time, helping the community. 

Did you know: The results of the 2020 Census help determine how billions of dollars in federal funding are spent locally for schools, hospitals, roads, and more.  So it's important that everyone is counted!  The Census is conducted every 10 years to ensure equal representation in elected government at the federal, state, and local levels.

The Census establishes Nebraska’s proportion of all federal funds for the next 10 years.  In fiscal year 2016, $3.995 billion in federal funds were obligated in Nebraska based upon resident counts from the 2010 Census and subsequent annual population estimates.  This equates to $2,096 in federal funds distributed annually for each Nebraska resident.  When residents are not counted the state loses federal dollars that should be sent to local areas.

Legal Research Contractor for the Center for Public Affairs Research at UNO, Micky Devitt, joins Mike Hogan "Live & Local" to discuss the importance of census participation and the recruitment drive to hire people to conduct the census.

If you are interested in applying for a position with the census or want more information about what they do with your information, go to https://2020census.gov/en/jobs.html

Nebraska is the first state to publicly acknowledge it will share drivers’ license records with the U.S. Census Bureau as the federal agency tries to comply with President Donald Trump’s order to count the number of U.S. citizens.

http://altoday.com/archives/28106-judge-blocks-citizenship-question-from-2020-census

One of the bills vetoed would have allowed a special committee to develop a plan to get as many people as possible to participate in the 2020 Census.

Ricketts said Tuesday that the bill gives inappropriate authority to a single program with no guidance, parameters, duties or goals. He notes that many local government and organizations already have "Complete Count" committees in place.

Nebraska's population is growing

Jan 4, 2018

Nebraska ranked 20th in the US in population growth rate between July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017.  

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — New U.S. Census Bureau data show Iowa and Nebraska's populations grew slower than the national average.