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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers doesn't expect to eliminate from its reservoir system all the leftover water from last year's near record runoff that led to massive flooding along the Missouri River. Officials are raising the current releases in expectation of high spring runoff again this year. The Corps' John Remus told the Omaha World-Herald the system needs to make as much space as possible in light of forecasts for warmer than normal weather and higher than normal runoff.

Hundreds of containers — many carrying hazardous materials — have floated into Missouri since flooding in the upper Missouri River basin during the spring.

Fans of the Missouri River can learn about its importance to the Great Plains at an upcoming lecture in Lincoln.

 The University of Nebraska’s Center for Great Plains Studies will host the lecture Thursday at 3:30 p.m. at its office in downtown Lincoln. The lecture will feature two speakers: Daniel Peterson, chief of interpretation, education and outreach for the National Park Service; and Jarrett C. Bies, a writer and kayaker. The presentation will include a short documentary film about conservation efforts on the Missouri River. The event is free and open to the public.

Eight months after flooding began along the lower Missouri River, the amount of water being released from dams upriver will start to be reduced later this month.

Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Flooding along the Missouri River has stretched on for seven months in places and could endure through the winter, leaving some Upper Midwest farmland and possibly some homes encased in ice. There are several reasons for the flooding, including high levels along the river, saturated ground and broken levees. And with forecasters predicting a wetter-than-normal winter, it’s possible flooding could continue in some places all the way until spring, when the normal flood season begins. “There’s no end in sight.

Nebraska Public Power District

The rising Missouri River has prompted Nebraska Public Power District’s Cooper Nuclear Station to declare a “Notification of Unusual Event.”   

Links to Traffic, Flood & Weather Conditions

Mar 15, 2019
Wikimedia Commons

The following are links to official sources of information that should provide current traffic, flooding, and weather conditions:

National Weather Service Omaha, Eppley Field

Nebraska 511 Travel Information

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Water Management

Conservationist photographer Alex Wiles joins Mike Hogan "Live & Local" on Morning Edition to discuss his current exhibition at Fontenelle Forest.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha, Bellevue and Sarpy County will be asked to pay more than $2 million each for levee repairs around Offutt Air Force Base.

www.fws.gov

It was 150 years ago that the steamboat Bertrand sank in the Missouri River north of Omaha.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — More rainfall than expected flowed into the Missouri River last month, but the river's reservoirs still have plenty of room because of this year's below-average snowfall.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska cities along the Missouri River are still waiting for nearly $7.2 million to be reimbursed from state and federal agencies, more than 3 years after a 2011 flood.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The list of landowners suing the federal government over major flooding along the Missouri River since 2006 has grown considerably.

RULO, Neb. (AP) — Officials are asking that residents of the southeastern Nebraska town of Rulo evacuate as the Missouri River swells to flood stage.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The federal government says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shouldn't be blamed for causing major flooding along the Missouri River.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha Public Power District officials say it will reduce power as it prepares for rising water on the Missouri River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is preparing to cut releases from Gavins Point Dam to winter levels.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says drought conservation measures will remain in place along the Missouri River basin.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — More than $180 million worth of repairs to Missouri River levees battered by the historic 2011 flooding are winding down. But critics complain the work is taking too long to complete.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Businesses that move products on the Mississippi River continue to seek the government's help as the river approaches historic lows.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and Missouri U.S. Senator Roy Blunt are joining the chorus expressing concern over the Army Corps of Engineers plan to reduce flow from an Missouri River reservoir, potentially affecting shipping on the Mississippi River.

Record low inflows in to the Missouri River basin in September

Oct 8, 2012

This year’s severe drought caused record low inflows in September in the Missouri River basin.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says runoff from the six dams that feed the Missouri River will be below normal the rest of the year.

In a news release, Corps officials say the July runoff forecast shows below-normal runoff for the rest of 2012. It’s at 87-percent of normal north of Sioux City.

Jody Farhat, chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says the lower runoff means normal operating conditions. It won’t affect the navigation season, which ends November 24th at Omaha.

The Missouri River is expected to drop nearly three feet at Omaha at the end of this week as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inspects Gavins Point Dam.

New levee being built along Missouri River near Nebraska City

Mar 30, 2012
courtesy Des Moines Register/Google Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to build a new, three-mile long levee near Nebraska City.

The $12.9 million project will re-align levee L-575 along Highway 2. It’ll be built further away from the Missouri River than the existing section of levee. Once it’s built, the existing levee at that location in Fremont County, Iowa, will be torn down. The Corps of Engineers awarded a contract earlier this week for the levee setback project.

Corps of Engineers to hold seven public meetings in April

Mar 28, 2012
courtesy Google Images

 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold seven public meetings next month in cities along the Missouri River.

The meetings will be held April 16th through 20th. Each is an opportunity for the public for hear from Northwest District officials about this year’s runoff season. The 2012 runoff season began March first.

Omaha’s meeting is April 18th at the Marriott. It begins at 6 PM.

Army Corps of Engineers officials say so far, this year’s Missouri River runoff season appears normal.

Western Iowa residents forced out of their homes by Missouri River flooding may have another option for temporary housing.

Iowa Finance Authority spokeswoman Ashley Jared says flood victims can apply for a waiver to live in housing usually restricted by the federal government to low-income families.

Jared says the waiver applies to flood victims in Monona, Harrison, Pottawattamie, Mills, and Fremont counties. People who lived in those counties between May 25th and August first of 2011 can apply for the housing waiver.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says additional storage space will be available in the six Missouri River main stem reservoirs this spring.

During a biweekly conference call Friday, Corps officials discussed conditions going in to the start of the spring runoff season, which begins March first. Jody Farhat, Chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says plains and mountain snowpack are below this time last year.