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Teachers are parading through the streets in Omaha to wave at their students through their windows. Erin Rathe [[rath]] is a preschool teacher at Ashland Greenwood Public Schools. She says she led the nearly 60-car parade of teachers wanting to see their students. Rathe said it was all smiles as teachers passed by their students' homes. She says the interaction was also heartbreaking because students and teachers have strong connections and are now separated because of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Officials for the Ralston Public School district are confirming that a staff member has tested positive for the coronavirus.  District officials say the staff member works at Ralston High School, and they began to have symptoms on March 16th.  Students were last in the building on March 12th, and the Douglas County Health Department says staff members who had direct contact with the employee have been notified.

Nebraska lawmakers will debate a new bill to lower property taxes as early as next week after a legislative committee endorsed it. Members of the Revenue Committee voted 6-1 in favor of the bill, which would provide roughly the same $520 million boost to Nebraska's K-12 public schools as an earlier proposal that stalled last month. Schools are the biggest consumers of local property tax revenue in Nebraska, and the bill would offer them the additional money along with tighter controls on their ability to tax and spend.

The Plattsmouth school district in eastern Nebraska has joined schools in Fremont and Hooper in canceling classes as a precaution against the spread of a new virus that originated in China. The district says classes and activities will be canceled Monday through Thursday. Classes already weren’t planned for Friday. The Omaha woman with the state’s first confirmed case of COVID-19 participated in a Special Olympics basketball tournament in Fremont on Feb. 29. Plattsmouth Community Schools said one of its students attended the tournament.

A bill designed to lower property taxes by boosting state aid for Nebraska's K-12 public schools has advanced out of a legislative committee but will still face opposition when lawmakers debate it. Members of the Revenue Committee voted 6-2 Wednesday to send the proposal to the full Legislature. The bill has won  support from farm and business groups, but some school districts have objected because they would lose some taxing authority and the bill would tighten state-imposed spending restrictions. Gov.