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Brendan Byrne

Jupiter is well-known for being the biggest planet in our solar system, and it's also home to the biggest storm. It's called the Great Red Spot, an enormous vortex that has been swirling for centuries. It's bigger than our own planet, and yet we don't know much about it. Until now, scientists could only observe the spot from afar. But thanks to a NASA spacecraft launched a decade ago, we're finally getting a look inside Jupiter's storm.

Updated October 30, 2021 at 10:11 AM ET

NASA and private rocket company SpaceX are set to launch four astronauts to the International Space Station on Wednesday from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It's the fifth human launch into orbit from the U.S. since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011.

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The International Space Station might be bigger than a football field, but it's equipped with just seven permanent sleeping pods, each about the size of a phone booth. NASA has to get creative for those rare times when there are more people than beds.

When the four new crew members arrive, they'll join seven already on board. Two astronauts will have to sleep in the docked SpaceX capsules. And that leaves two others without beds — but that's not a problem. "The nice thing about sleeping in space is that just about anywhere can be your bedroom," said NASA spokesman Dan Huot.

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Two NASA astronauts have arrived at the International Space Station, 19 hours after launching from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken made the trip on a private space vehicle designed, built and launched by SpaceX.

SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule docked with the station at 10:17 a.m. ET while flying over the border of northern China and Mongolia.

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Two NASA astronauts got suited up today at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and folks there saw something they hadn't seen in almost nine years - astronauts heading to the launch pad ready to blast off.

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When NASA astronauts launch from the Kennedy Space Center, it will be the first time humans have blasted off from the U.S. since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.

The pilot of that final shuttle mission was Doug Hurley, and he's aboard again Wednesday, ready to make history with the launch of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule.