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Music

Content from KIOS staff relating to jazz, blues, and all kinds of music.

2020 Maha Music Festival Cancelled

Apr 8, 2020

This year's MAHA music festival is cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Organizers today said the festival will return in 2021. It was scheduled to run August fifth-through-eighth with outdoor performances in Stinson Park.

Bucky Pizzarelli, a tasteful sage of jazz guitar who spent the first phase of his career as a prolific session player and the last phase as a celebrated patriarch, died on Wednesday in Saddle River, N.J. He was 94.

Guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli, his oldest son and regular musical partner, said the cause was the coronavirus.

Ellis Marsalis, jazz pianist, educator, and patriarch of the Marsalis family, has died at the age of 85. His death was announced in tweets from New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell and Jazz at Lincoln Center, where his son Wynton is managing and artistic director.

He reportedly went into the hospital over the weekend with symptoms of pneumonia. The New York Times reports that his son Branford says the cause of death was complications from COVID-19.

Wallace Roney, a trumpeter and composer who embodied the pugnacious, harmonically restive side of post-bop throughout an illustrious four-decade career, died this morning at St. Joseph's University Medical Center in Paterson, N.J. He was 59.

The cause was complications from COVID-19, according to his fiancée, Dawn Felice Jones. She said Roney had been admitted to the hospital last Wednesday.

Jazz Calendar (Updated 3/27/2020)

Mar 27, 2020

Updated on Saturday, March 7 at 11:45 a.m. ET

McCoy Tyner, a pianist whose deep resonance, hammering attack and sublime harmonic invention made him a game-changing catalyst in jazz and beyond, died Friday, March 6, at his home in New Jersey. His death was confirmed by his manager. No cause of death was given. He was 81.


Plaid Tidings: Forever Plaid by Stuart Ross is an extraordinary 2-hour energetic extravaganza featuring the best of Forever Plaid tied-up in a nifty package with a big Christmas bow at the top!  Filled with Christmas standards that have all been "Plaid-erized," our boys are back to do their Christmas Special.  At first they aren't sure why they've returned, but a phone call from the heavenly Rosemary Clooney lets them know that they're needed to put a little harmony into a discordant world.

Jon Hickerson, who plays Frankie, stopped by the KIOS-FM studios to chat with Mike Hogan about this energetic, funny, music-filled sequel to the hit "Forever Plaid."

Sprinkled among the Christmas offerings are audience favorites like the riotous three minute and eleven second version of "The Ed Sullivan Show" - this time featuring the Rockettes, the Chipmunks and the Vienna Boys Choir, and a Plaid Caribbean Christmas which puts the "Day-O" in excelsis!  This is one holiday treat that is truly "heavenly-sent!"

December 12th begins the last weekend of performances.  Rob Lohman and Kristin Lyon present pre-show entertainment 45-minutes before each performance.  ​Special guest appearance by Peggy Holloway.  More information on tickets and showtimes is available at http://www.performingartistsrepertorytheatre.org/.

An anthology devoted to early Nat King Cole recordings was recently released, and it offers a new window into his artistic development. The collection is called Hittin' the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943), and this massive 7-CD, 10-LP package is clearly aimed at obsessives. It's a deep dive that traces Nat King Cole's evolution — from smooth, unflappable piano player into a singing star with an endearingly smooth style all his own.

Electric Miles. Few word pairings in the jazz lexicon are apt to inspire so much contention and challenge and ferment. What the phrase refers to, of course, is a period in the career of trumpeter Miles Davis, spanning the last third of his life. And while there are other important antecedents, the big bang of this period is an album recorded 50 years ago by the name of Bitches Brew.

Cannonball Adderley was a mere 46 when he died, of a brain hemorrhage, in 1975. An alto saxophonist of robust intellect and irrefutable soul, he left a monumental legacy during his two decades in the spotlight — as a member of the Miles Davis Sextet, an exemplar of 1960s soul jazz and the leading avatar of a brand of post-bop modernism with popular appeal.

From a casual distance, the music of João Gilberto sounds like it might belong to that ancient realm known as "easy listening."

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