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Music

Content from KIOS staff relating to jazz, blues, and all kinds of music.

Jazz Calendar (Updated 1/21/2020)

Jan 21, 2020

 

Plaid Tidings: Forever Plaid by Stuart Ross is an extraordinary 2-hour energetic extravaganza featuring the best of Forever Plaid tied-up in a nifty package with a big Christmas bow at the top!  Filled with Christmas standards that have all been "Plaid-erized," our boys are back to do their Christmas Special.  At first they aren't sure why they've returned, but a phone call from the heavenly Rosemary Clooney lets them know that they're needed to put a little harmony into a discordant world.

Jon Hickerson, who plays Frankie, stopped by the KIOS-FM studios to chat with Mike Hogan about this energetic, funny, music-filled sequel to the hit "Forever Plaid."

Sprinkled among the Christmas offerings are audience favorites like the riotous three minute and eleven second version of "The Ed Sullivan Show" - this time featuring the Rockettes, the Chipmunks and the Vienna Boys Choir, and a Plaid Caribbean Christmas which puts the "Day-O" in excelsis!  This is one holiday treat that is truly "heavenly-sent!"

December 12th begins the last weekend of performances.  Rob Lohman and Kristin Lyon present pre-show entertainment 45-minutes before each performance.  ​Special guest appearance by Peggy Holloway.  More information on tickets and showtimes is available at http://www.performingartistsrepertorytheatre.org/.

An anthology devoted to early Nat King Cole recordings was recently released, and it offers a new window into his artistic development. The collection is called Hittin' the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943), and this massive 7-CD, 10-LP package is clearly aimed at obsessives. It's a deep dive that traces Nat King Cole's evolution — from smooth, unflappable piano player into a singing star with an endearingly smooth style all his own.

Electric Miles. Few word pairings in the jazz lexicon are apt to inspire so much contention and challenge and ferment. What the phrase refers to, of course, is a period in the career of trumpeter Miles Davis, spanning the last third of his life. And while there are other important antecedents, the big bang of this period is an album recorded 50 years ago by the name of Bitches Brew.

Cannonball Adderley was a mere 46 when he died, of a brain hemorrhage, in 1975. An alto saxophonist of robust intellect and irrefutable soul, he left a monumental legacy during his two decades in the spotlight — as a member of the Miles Davis Sextet, an exemplar of 1960s soul jazz and the leading avatar of a brand of post-bop modernism with popular appeal.

From a casual distance, the music of João Gilberto sounds like it might belong to that ancient realm known as "easy listening."

Laughter may be the best medicine but music is not far behind! 

The Nebraska Medical Orchestra (NMO) was created in 2018 as a collaborative project between UNMC and the UNO School of Music, the Nebraska Medical Orchestra is comprised of students, faculty, and staff from UNMC and Nebraska Medicine with the support of UNO School of Music faculty and students as mentors.  

Dr. Washington Garcia, professor and director of UNO's School of Music, has been working with partners at UNMC to develop this "medical orchestra" for the benefit of patients, their families, and medical staff as well.

Dr. Garcia joins Mike Hogan "Live & Local" to discuss the genesis of this program and the many benefits it produces.

More information can be found at https://www.unomaha.edu/college-of-communication-fine-arts-and-media/music/community-engagement/index.php

Chris Cooke/KIOS

Mike Jacobs/KIOS

In 2005, even as the flood waters that rose in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina subsumed his home along with countless others, Allen Toussaint was reluctant to leave his city. But the elegant architect of New Orleans rhythm and blues was left with no other option. Just a day after his evacuation, in an interview with Rolling Stone, he described the experience less in terms of what had been lost than what could yet be gained.

As much as jazz could possibly have an inventor, that person would be Charles "Buddy" Bolden. But although he is celebrated as a seminal figure in jazz at the turn of the 20th century, very little is actually known about the African-American cornetist and composer's life. There are no existing recordings of Bolden, who spent more than 20 years in an asylum before his death in 1931.

The rules of musical gravity don't apply for the spirited saxophonist, composer and producer Kamasi Washington. Washington's roots are in jazz, but he can turn his saxophone into a soaring bird or a spaceship, a howling wolf or a karate kick.

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